JU-D Weekly Note

Dear Families,

The finish line is in sight in JU-D. Students spent the penultimate week of school disassembling our cluttered classroom, building city centers for our simulation, and enjoying the warm weather on our field day. 

It all started with a colossal room cleanup. The teahouse, big map of China, and countless cluttered walls were taken apart in a flurry of deconstruction. When students weren't disassembling the room, they were meeting in mixed city groups. The preparation for next week’s Silk Routes simulation wrapped up as students finalized their city centers and finished developing their characters. Friday capped off an excellent week as the entire TPS community gathered for some healthy competition at Markward Playground. There were relay races, soccer variants, and a good old-fashioned tug-of-war. It was a wonderful way to cap off the week.

We are looking forward to the start of our simulation on Monday. Be sure to talk to your kids about the rich and historically accurate character that they’ve created. 

Nick and Noelle 

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear Families,

It was a wet end to the week as JU-B/JU-D explored a collection of sources that connected "The Story of Stuff" to the ubiquitous iPad. Through a variety of videos, articles, and research challenges, students traced the journey of the iPad from extraction to disposal. This weekend they will complete a cumulative assessment that will analyze the connections students made between experiential learning in the field and explicit classroom instruction. 

Prior to this jam-packed Thursday, students forged their way through ERB testing and even managed to squeeze in a few meetings in their city groups. In these groups, students worked to build a city center, construct a playable character, and gather solid information on their city. While somewhat chaotic, these construction periods are filled with the excitement that students are sure to bring to our Silk Roads simulation. 

Here are few important dates to look forward to:

  • May 30, June 1 - Launch of Silk Road Simulation
  • June 1 - Chinese Feast
  • June 2 - Rainbow Day/Field Day
  • June 5 through June 7 - Silk Road Simulation at TPS
  • June 8 - Silk Road Simulation at The Schuylkill Center
  • June 9 - Graduation (11:30 a.m. dismissal)

Have a great weekend!

Noelle and Nick

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear JU-D Families,

This week JU students met often in cross-classroom groups. On Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, students met by City Group.  Students were assigned to eight cities that were located along trading routes -- we now refer to these routes collectively as the Silk Roads --  that connected China with other cultures. Students have been learning about their cities in order to prepare for the simulation.  They are building city centers, determining distances between cities, considering how the fates might impact them, and developing a character rooted in the culture of their assigned cities. Students were all sent home with a packet to support the writing of this culminating Character Sketch; the packet includes a graphic organizer, a scoring rubric that can help a student know when a piece is “good enough,” and a sheet to help students reveal who their character is rather than “telling.”

Our silkworms have managed to survive another week. Phew! Students were astonished at their growth. They also began noticing distinct characteristics of the silkworm body, saw evidence of molting, and learned what parts make up the digestive system of the silkworm. 

As we head into next week, a few reminders:  First and foremost, the ERB tests that students will take is truly practice. We hope you will support our efforts to encourage students to do their best without worrying them. They have been tested in many ways this year and will continue to be in the weeks and years ahead. Students are permitted to bring in mints during our testing window; we are aware that this is an exception to our no candy rule. If you want to explore more about this decision, feel free to check out this link with a brief explanation: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1lJkLIf-9977FZGxOuP1LI0J3zOB4nmtWoTt5DKxkaIs/edit?usp=sharing. Students will get some extra recess between test sessions, and they will be permitted to eat extra snacks, if they are so inclined, during times of free play.

Enjoy the warm weather this weekend, and perhaps we will see you at EATS! 

Truly,

Noelle and Nick

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear JU-D Families,

The week and the school year are rapidly coming to a close! That’s right, a whole year has almost passed. As students look forward to the summer weather, we’ve been drafting allyship magazines, testing for industrial contamination, and forging ahead in our study of the Silk Route. 

Over the past few weeks, the Junior Unit has worked to complete a magazine about allyship. This magazine discusses many of the topics covered in our identity community meetings this year. This week marked the final round of meetings for creating the magazine. Over the next few weeks students will work on finalizing writing and visuals, and will begin to tackle formatting and publishing our zine. 

This week we continued to move around the city testing soil, water, and air for evidence of the effects of our industrialized, globalized world. This week we finally returned to The Schuylkill Center where we completed our last round of testing. Moving forward we will compare samples gathered at Valley Green, the Manayunk Towpath, the Schuylkill River by TPS, and The Schuylkill Center. We’ll be analyzing and looking for trends in our results to see if we can glimpse the ways in which Philadelphia has been affected by The Material Economy. 

Finally, students worked to create idea webs that encompass their learning about the Silk Route. This note taking format allows students to stretch their thinking, make connections, and generate questions. Over the next week we’ll be working to further strengthen JU-D understandings of the Silk Route and its effect on history. This knowledge will fuel our year-end simulation of the Silk Route, something teachers and students alike are looking forward to. 

A piece of JU-D information:

ERB testing is coming up in JU. May 22-25 will be testing days (the 25th is a makeup). Please talk to your kids about their feelings and remind them that this is practice for the future. On test days please be sure to send kids to school with plenty of food and make sure that they get to bed early!

Truly, 

Noelle and Nick

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear Families,

This week we received feedback that the homework load has felt very heavy.It was not our intention to inundate JU-D students.  If you take a look at this week’s assignments, we can explain how they connect to the final weeks of the 2016-2017 school year.  We also want to let you know that to support these assignments, we have been providing students with workshop time (about 80 minutes) during the week. Our hope is that this frames what you observed this week and leaves you prepared for what’s to come between now and 8th grade graduation.

Students are preparing for the Silk Roads Simulation, an all-JU interactive game experience that takes place in the final week of the year. They are reading the book The Silk Road: 7,000 Miles of History. We assigned this reading last Wednesday and asked students to follow this schedule:

Thursday, April 20: Read pages 2-9
Monday, April 24: Read pages 10-17
Wednesday, April 26: Read pages 18-25
Friday, April 28: Read pages 26-32

For each assigned chunk, we asked students to capture three new pieces of information. We anticipated this would take about 30 minutes.

We look forward to the exciting simulation that will be the culmination of this project, and we will certainly keep an eye on student work to make sure everyone feels supported.

Nick and Noelle 

 

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear JU-D families,

Happy Earth Day! This week we continued to explore "The Story of Stuff" and the materials economy both at TPS and in Manayunk. We compared the development of this area of our city to that of Beijing and began to test the water, soil, and air in order to find evidence of the way these types of developments affect the ecology of a space. 

Back at TPS we continued to explore the Silk Routes and began readings intended to solidify background knowledge on this subject. This experience will culminate in a simulation of the Silk Routes in a Junior Unit wide trading game. 

Looking ahead to next week, it is extremely important that students come to school on Schuylkill Center days with a water bottle. We are moving between sites on Thursdays, and access to drinking water can be tricky! Next week we will go to The Schuylkill Center and Valley Green to continue testing and taking samples in search of the effects of The Story of Stuff. 

Have a great weekend!

Noelle and Nick

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear Families,

It was a wonderful week back from break in JU-D. From book groups, to community meeting, to a new unit in science, we used the week to shake off the cobwebs and to hit the ground running. 

It all started Monday with the launch of our JU-B/JU-D book groups. Before break we explored four different books, and JU-Ders rated their interest in each. This week we began working in these mixed groups. The books we selected are Dragonwings, The Kiterider, Red Scarf Girl, and In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson. Although we are only three sessions into the experience, students have been arriving with great enthusiasm and excitement about their reading. 

Outside of books groups we continued to push through our identity study. This week we took a glimpse at changing relationships and began a discussion about attraction and sexual identity. Students were introduced to the wide spectrum and varied nature of attraction and changing friendships. 

Finally, we began a study of the environmental effects of industrialization, globalization, and consumerism. Using "The Story of Stuff" as a lens to explore these systems, JU members began with a thought experiment where they imagined the journey a Chinese manufactured object has taken (from raw materials on) to get into their possession. We introduced the idea of a system for production and consumption detailed in "The Story of Stuff." Over the next few weeks, students will work to discover the effects of this system in Philadelphia. 

Here are a few useful pieces of JU-D information:

  • We will be visiting the PMA next Wednesday to view artifacts from the Silk Road.
  • We will resume our trips to The Schuylkill Center each Thursday. Please send your students to school with a water bottle and long-sleeved clothing.
  • Here is a link to "The Story of Stuff." Check it out and discuss it with your kids! https://youtu.be/9GorqroigqM

Have a great weekend

Truly,

Noelle and Nick

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear JU-D Families, 

We thought we were in the clear of winter this week, but March had other ideas. Despite the sudden snow dump, JU-D continued to rumble forward in our preparation for student-led conferences. Students spent the bulk of the week looking back over a colossal load of work. After taking a look at teacher goals synthesized from narrative reports, students considered their progress, successes, and areas to work on. They are working to craft a clear presentation of this work to all of you at home. While there are pre-conference jitters to be sure, overall students are excited for the opportunity.

All the while, students continued to monitor the growth of their fast plants. They learned about the process of pollination and even got to take part in this essential part of the plant life cycle as they pollinated their own plants. In the weeks ahead we should begin to see the growth of seeds. We will compare the seed harvests of variable plants to the production of our classroom control group.

Next week will be a short one as conferences start on Thursday. If you haven’t already done so, please sign up for a Doodle poll. 

Nick’s Doodle: http://doodle.com/poll/fm8i5wu4tkguvusc

Noelle’s Doodle: http://doodle.com/poll/vvkead3p7yn3zbwz

Have a good weekend,

Nick and Noelle

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear JUD Families,

The big event this week was a visit from four Chinese musicians playing traditional Chinese instruments. They were truly talented musicians, and it was a joyful experience in which students sang, listened, and a few had the chance to try out some of the instruments. Peter Tang led this group, and he discussed the origin of the instruments.  In this description, there were comments that ran counter to our discussions about gender, which we discussed in the classroom the following day, which happened to be International Women’s Day. This work led to a number of provocative topics, including the “Masculinity Crisis” being covered in Chinese media, the One Child Policy, and foot binding. Ask your child to share the Jueju poem about being a man or being a woman.

Students also continued the writing process, turning their outlines for the Religious Places Paper into a rough draft. The standard for a rough draft includes editing that is a student’s best independent work. Three times now, students have used the process of note-taking, outlining, drafting from the outline, revising, and editing.  With practice, this process becomes simpler. Expect to see the way this process played out for your child at the student-led conference.

We continue to read The Tao of Pooh together, connecting the major principles of Taoism with the shenanigans of Winnie the Pooh and his friends. Students are enjoying it. This week, we discussed Inner Nature. Ask your child what Taoists believe about the Inner Nature of people and objects.

Our fast plants are also growing. Embedded in this work are various elements of scientific instruction. Students are learning about data collection, including finding the range, mean, median, and mode. They are growing more adept at observing closely, measuring precisely, sketching carefully, and framing questions. You’ll get the chance to see the way that their journaling has progressed. The classroom is abuzz with excitement over these tiny plants. 

As we near the time for student-led conferences, students are doing a fair bit of reflecting. They have had the chance to review critical feedback that their teachers described in reports.  This gives them a chance to consider what goals to prioritize and to reflect on growth since early in January. If you have not yet signed up for a conference, please visit our Doodles or email us so we can make sure every student has a date for which they are planning.

Have a wonderful weekend.

Truly,

Nick & Noelle

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear JU-D Families,

We can check off another jam-packed week of learning in JU-D. Students researched religions, monitored fast plant progress, and learned about the ways that gender roles are reinforced in our society. 

Students dipped their toes into the intricate and nuanced world of religion. They worked to gather information about the way a given religion impacts the structure and landscape of a specific city. Through this work JU-Ders are realizing that the religious climate of the world is far more complex than they had originally realized. 

In our work with fast plants, students saw the early payoff of their efforts as tiny shoots began to poke through their soil early this week. It is still unclear how their given variable is affecting plant growth, but as students sketch and label their plants, we should begin to see variables affecting plant growth and seed productions. 

Finally, through a study of segmented advertisement, students analyzed the way that gender roles are reinforced in society as companies search for larger profit. Students walked out of this session with an understanding of the way that outside influences affect their own images of gender and what is expected of them. 

Have a great weekend.

Truly,

Noelle & Nick 

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear Families,

It seems as though spring has sprung (at least for the moment). With this change in weather, JU-D began to get their hands dirty, launched a new project, and continued to unpack the complexities of identity in our community meeting. 

It all began with the official start to our Fast Plants experimentation. Over the past couple of weeks, JU-D students have learned about the scientific process, the plant life cycle, and experimental variables. This week we put these ideas into practice as students began planting their Fast Plants. The goal is to use an experimental variable to produce the most seeds from one given plant. Students looked at space, soil, water, and light as individual variables, and decided to alter one of these pieces. Groups have decided to change water delivery systems, soil composition, and even levels of light exposure. Over the next few weeks we will observe growth of these plants and determine how beneficial or detrimental our variables were. 

Along with looking at the complex systems within Fast Plants, students continued to investigate human systems and the way they change and are viewed throughout puberty. This week we delved into the notion of assigned sex, gender, and attraction. Students worked to understand the ways these ideas are and are not connected, as well as how they all make up a significant part of human identity. 

Finally, JU-D spent part of the week analyzing religious demographics in order to see the nuanced ways that religion is practiced in modern China. JU-Ders learned how to analyze demographics and began a project in which they will analyze and unpack the complex religious traditions of a city in Asia. This project will allow students to see the complex relationship between faith and place, as well as the diverse and varied representations of religions across Asia. 

A quick note: Conferences will take place on March 23 and 24th. These conferences will be led by students. Doodle polls for sign-up will be available early next week; look for an email with the links. Feel free to reach out with questions or scheduling concerns. We are looking forward to talking with families! 

Truly,

Noelle and Nick

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear Families,

After last week's action-packed week of building and showing off our efforts, JU-D spent this week returning to classroom routines and resetting the class for new rounds of learning. 

We began by taking a look at our progress around SSR and independent reading. Students worked to get a general sense of their pace by calculating their pages per minute during a reading session. They used this information to set goals on the completion of their independent reading book. Moving forward, students will work to track their progress in a shared spreadsheet.

We also jumped back into our work with Fast Plants. Students were broken into groups this week to study how temperature, light exposure, soil composition, and watering can affect the growth of fast plants. As we move forward, students will work to create experimental variables to test out on their plants. We will track seed production as a way of understanding how beneficial or harmful a given variable was. 

In our Bodies study, students began to unpack some of the specific changes that occur as humans move through the process of puberty. Students worked to understand and categorize some of the changes that occur in the body and the effects that these changes can have. 

All in all it was a refreshing week back, made special by an unexpected snow day.  Have a great weekend!

See you next week,

Nick and Noelle

 

Truly,

 

Noelle and Nick

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear JU-D Families,

It was a pleasure having you in the classroom this week. JU-Ders were so proud to welcome you into their space and to show off the products of massive amount of work we’ve done in the past few weeks. A week of intense building seriously drained the entire class, and we spent the afternoon yesterday recovering and reflecting on the celebration as a whole. Students will bring home a letter reflecting on the learning that they experienced throughout the project. Please read over it with them and discuss the things that went well and the things that were hard. 

Finally, reports are published and online. Let us know if you would like to discuss anything in greater detail or if you have any questions about student progress. Thanks again for being a part of this learning community. We hope you have a great weekend. 

Truly,

Noelle and Nick

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear JU-D Families,

The days flew by this week in a flurry of construction. The teahouse is beginning to take shape, and we enjoyed a papier-mache lesson taught by Nick Dekker’s mother, art teacher Debby Pollak. We want to point out that we are skipping Friday Folders this week as a way to save time for the massive construction project we have undertaken. Over the weekend your children may try to access the website Adobe Spark, which is a presentation program. JU-D has a shared account that they can log into to create their presentation. The username is ndekker@tpschool.org and the password is JU-d2511.         

This week we reviewed some terms we use to describe our bodies, such as sex as anatomy. We also learned about the diversity of our bodies as we discussed how sex is a spectrum that includes male, intersex, and female bodies. You can ask your child to share with you what they learned about the development of babies and about what it is like to be intersex.                           

We are looking forward to seeing you next Thursday in JU-D for our celebration of the Chinese New Year. 

Truly,

Noelle and Nick

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear JU-D Families,

JU-D was abuzz this week as construction of our teahouse and 3-D map began to ramp up. Walking by the classroom you might have heard sewing machines buzzing, keyboards clacking, and students snapping shut measuring tapes. After so much talking and planning, students were thrilled to finally begin getting their hands dirty as they carried out their ideas. 

Outside of construction, JU-Ders continued their work with reading comprehension and retention. This week students decided which study skill to use and were able to see the result of this choice on their understanding of the material. Along with this work, we experimented with dialogue in short stories and learned about exposition in writing. 

In our health curriculum students continue to delve into human reproductive anatomy. Our past two Bodies curriculum lessons have focused on male and female reproductive anatomy, including the journey of egg and sperm through one's own body and the way a baby develops from both cells. Understandably, this has raised questions for many students around how sperm and egg meet. Because we are not covering sexual intercourse in this curriculum, we have told students that these are great questions that they can discuss more with their families at home. Students may be coming home this week eager to discuss these questions with you.

There will be a pretzel sale sponsored by JU-B this Monday ($1.00 each, and an additional 25¢ for mustard).

Have a wonderful weekend.

Truly,

Noelle and Nick

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear JU-D Families,

Your students began an exciting multi-faceted construction project this week. In the few days we had, we packed in planning sessions and began laying out and designing both a tea house and a three-dimensional map of China. JU-D members were excited to get going and excitedly researched and debated the best possible ways to complete these projects. Next week we'll begin construction. Your children are likely looking forward to showing you their hard work. 

Outside of our project work, we continued to unpack nonfiction reading strategies and began to develop a course of experimentation for our JU-D fast plants science project. Students are buzzing about differing variables and are already scheming about the way to grow the most successful plants. 

Have a wonderful extended weekend. We're looking forward to getting back to work. 

Truly, 

Noelle and Nick 

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear JU-D Families, 

It was a great and energizing week back from break. The new year brought with it several fresh starts. 

We began two classroom projects. The Big Map project gives students the opportunity to make our outline map of China a 3-D model that captures what we’ve learned about topography, waterways, cities, and history.  Half of the class has been assigned to this project.  The other half of the class has begun the teahouse project.  Inspired by our trip to the Philadelphia Art Museum, students are now building background knowledge around the differences between Japanese teahouses and Chinese teahouses.  They are also studying the rituals, societal connections, history, and growing processes of tea.  This information will inform their choices as they construct a life-size teahouse which you will get to visit at our Open House on February 2nd.

We also began a nonfiction unit on Life in Ancient China.  This week, students read six pages independently, working (a) to understand what they read and (b) to retain what they learned from the readings.  Today, they took an assessment to gauge their comprehension and retention. We have begun the discussion about what it takes to figure out what is most important and then hold onto that information.  We will continue work with this text and these skills over the coming weeks.

Students also began to prepare for a science experiment around fast plants.  You can read about these interesting plants here: http://www.fastplants.org/about/the_story_of_fast_plants.php. Students will ultimately use their understanding of plant biology to design an experiment to grow the greatest number of seeds possible.  This look at reproductive success will continue as students participate in our bodies curriculum throughout the winter, and it will also connect to our study of the trophic pyramid this past fall. Lots of connections mean a greater chance of long term memory retention.

Not all was new, though.  Students are using the background knowledge they built about ancient civilizations to write a second auspicious places paper.  This week, they completed their research, though some students are filling in gaps over the weekend.  Next week they will write the paper.

Want to start a discussion about school with your child?  Consider asking them these questions:

  • Where did you decide to place your new civilization?
  • On which class project are you working?
  • What body systems did you learn about this week?
  • How did you spend your lunch period this week?

It was an excellent start to the new year, with lots of curiosity and participation from our JUD scholars.  We look forward to more next week!

Enjoy the weekend and stay warm.

Truly,

Noelle & Nick

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear JU-D families,

We made it to winter break!

We had a solid week of learning as students maintained heroic focus in the face of pre-holiday jitters. This week students worked to complete a comprehensive project about our class reading of Where the Mountain Meets the Moon, finalized an essay about character development in their book, and selected a location in China to begin a thoughtful experiment about creating a new civilization.

All the while students were balancing their energy and focus with celebrations of the season, like the winter concert and an a cappella concert. It’s been a wonderful year so far, and we are looking forward to hitting the ground running in January.

Have a wonderful, warm, and safe holiday season and enjoy the time with family! We’re excited to spend 2017 with you all.

Truly,

Noelle and Nick

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear JU-D Families,

It was another adventurous week in JU-D. We enjoyed the winter weather as we explored the Chinese landscape, looked for locations to build a new civilization, finished up our class reading, and took a tour through Chinatown. 

This week students utilized satellite images to find the perfect spot for a new civilization. In teams they generated lists of geographically desirable and undesirable characteristics for starting a new society. We were able to build on prior knowledge about the birth of civilization to generate these lists. Opinions differed on what was actually best for civilization. Some students searched for areas with high mountains, while others were convinced that expansive plains and prairie land would be best. We will take these ideas and build on them as we begin a study of the roots of Chinese civilization in the Yellow River basin. 

This week marked the end of our reading of Where the Mountain Meets the Moon. Students are currently engaging in a red string project that will ask them to make connections across the entire book as they analyze the way folk tales influenced the story and the themes of the novel. 

Along with our study of ancient civilizations and our class reading we looked to the present this week as we journeyed to Chinatown. Studying this area allows students to see the way east and west have met in our own culture. Students realized through interviews and analyses of mural art that despite its name, Chinatown is actually a mosaic of cultures and experiences. Although it does not connect to China alone, this experience allowed students to see the way communities form while navigating cultural, ethnic, and racial differences. This gave students the chance to use skills we have been building to strengthen cultural competencies, including active listening and stereotype dismantling.

Finally, the week culminated in a celebration of the holidays and the spirit that goes along with them. The TPS community came out in force to sing a variety of seasonal songs at Encuentro. Students and teachers raised their voices in celebration of the season across multiple religious traditions, as well as songs that embrace the best of winter.

We hope you enjoy what is looking like a cold winter weekend ahead.  Please note a few brief reminders:

  • You should expect an email about the Bodies curriculum that Junior Unit will begin in the new year.  Thanks for reading it and responding.
  • On Wednesday at 9:00 a.m., please join us for the Junior Unit winter concert. 

Have a good weekend,

Nick and Noelle

JU-D Weekly Note

Dear JU-D families,

We are hitting our stride as we enter December. This week we continued to explore prehistoric human development, we experienced the treasures of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and we heard from a published author about his craft and life. 

In our theme study, students learned about the shift from hunting and gathering to permanent settlement. Moving forward, JU-Ders will use what they have learned about the birth of civilization to choose the perfect place to start a new society in China. They will select this location by exploring topographical maps and researching the Chinese landscape. In the coming weeks students will craft an essay that explains why their proposed location in the Chinese landscape would be beneficial for human civilization. This work is leading towards a study of the Yellow River civilization, one of the earliest examples in history. 

To see the product of all of this human development, we journeyed to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. We looked at the vast variety of art produced by Chinese civilization. We enjoyed a guided tour and worked as visual detectives to discover the purpose of the art on display. Students were thrilled by this opportunity and began to bubble with connections from what we have covered so far in class. 

The week ended with an exciting presentation by published local writer Alexander London. This exciting opportunity provided JU members with a glimpse of the writer’s process and the way creativity can be cultivated along with writer’s craft. Check in with your kids about this moment as it may have inspired them both as readers and writers.                                                                  

Along with many other educational opportunities, students are using Keyboarding Without Tears to learn keyboarding skills, computer literacy, and digital citizenship.  The program is built so that students can use the student license they have from school for practice outside the school. 

To access the program, you will need a laptop or desktop with internet access. You can start the program by clicking on this link: http://program.kwtears.com/?HOME_USE_TOKEN. It will launch in your default browser. Bookmark this page for easy access. Once the program has launched, your child should choose his/her grade and then key in his/her Secret Code (likely written down in their assigned notebook or memorized by now).

Students will be able to practice right away by picking up where they last left off on the challenge board. If your student has forgotten his/her Secret Code and did not write the code down anywhere, you may contact Matt M., our technology integrator, for the code. His email address is mmurray@tpschool.org. We recommend that your child work on Keyboarding Without Tears for no more than 10-20 minutes per day outside the classroom. Speed, fluency, and accuracy will develop with regular practice over a sustained period of time. To learn more about the Keyboarding Without Tears curriculum please go to www.kwtears.com.

We will finally be taking our trip to Chinatown this coming Thursday. Although we will be taking a bus from TPS, students should remember to bring jackets and a water bottle. 

About TPS Service: In the interest of providing each of our students with the most meaningful service experience possible, we are making some mid-year changes to the TPS Service requirements. If your child completed a Fall service job, they do not need to complete another term of service. Students who did not complete a Fall job must sign up for only one of the remaining terms. Students who completed a Fall job and want to sign up for another term may do so, but students who have not yet completed their service requirement will be given priority. We also encourage families who already participate in service outside of school -- for neighborhood parks, with faith organizations, etc. -- to use that service toward completion of the TPS service requirement.  

Truly,

Noelle and Nick